BREVIEW: The Winslow Boy @ Birmingham REP until 03.03.18

The Winslow Boy @ Birmingham REP until 03.03.18

Words by Lucy Mounfield / Production shots by Alastair Muir

Having read Terence Rattigan’s The Winslow Boy during a long summer a few years ago, I have been waiting to see a stage revival ever since. So, I was pleased to see the play on the listings for the Birmingham REP.

Rattigan’s plays rarely require large sets or technical apparatus, it is the story and the way the characters interact that is so appealing about his work. Yet, when I first read The Winslow Boy I struggled to see how the Edwardian period and antebellum tensions could be adapted for a modern audience.

The basic plot – a young naval cadet, Ronnie Winslow (Misha Butler), has been accused of stealing a five-shilling postal order, which he denies – first appears as rather a dull premise for a two and a half hour play. Indeed, Rattigan and his writing style fell out of favour during the 60s, and this has consequently somewhat tarnished the reputation of his plays.

However, there is a striking amount of depth and layering with which Rattigan imbues a situation. Far from being dull, he adds humour; characters are defined and grow with the story. Tension builds throughout The Winslow Boy, as each person loses something in the fight for Ronnie’s innocence.

The Winslow Boy‘s director, Rachel Kavanaugh, has a firm grip on the principles and themes running through Rattigan’s storytelling, as she makes her stage production resonate with a modern audience. The play manages to show us the intimate lives of the Winslow family, whilst projecting the social and political struggles of the early 20th century and at the same time echoing today’s resurgent feminist movement.

(L-R) Dorothea Myer-Bennett as Catherine Winslow, Tessa Peake-Jones as Grace Winsow / Alastair MuirThe nuance of Rattigan’s writing is equally matched by the actors on stage. 2018 marks the centenary of voting rights for women and this is something that the play very touchingly points to with the character of Catherine (Dorothea Myer-Bennett), Ronnie’s sister, who is an ardent suffragette. Myer-Bennett’s portrayal takes us through a range of emotional registers, and the story, which takes place over several years, gives the character time to develop. We see her strident determination to confront injustice, the stubbornness she shares with her father, alongside the Catherine’s conflict between seeing the case through and her relationship with her equivocating fiancée (William Belchambers).

For me, Myer- Bennett and Aden Gillett, who portrays her father, Arthur, form the glue that keeps the play together. Their acting exudes confidence of character, driving the pace of the story along while vividly bringing Rattigan’s writing to life(L-R) Aden Gilett as Arthur Winslow and Tessa Peake-Jones as Grace Winslow / Alastair Muir. As a loving, yet authoritative, father figure, Arthur seeks to exonerate his son of petty wrongdoing seemingly at any cost – for to him, it is the principle of the thing that matters; no matter that he is bankrupting his family over the theft of five shillings and rapidly succumbing to arthritis. Gillett is superb in displaying the crippling effects of this ailment, developing a stoop, hunch back and bowed legs until finally he takes to a wheelchair.

The mother, Grace Winslow (Tessa Peake-Jones), reminds me of the slightly naive Mrs. Bennet in Pride and Prejudice and is a good foil for the more assertive characters, balancing comedy with pathos. The impassioned speech to her husband at the start of Act Two is a poignant reminder of the impact the play’s events have on the family and their now fractured relationships.(L-R) Misha Butler as Ronnie Winslow, Aden Gillet as Arthur Winsow and Timothy Watson as Sir Robert Morton / Alastair MuirThis is made more so by the presence of Ronnie Winslow, who is gently sleeping on a chaise longue. His youth is made shockingly apparent, which makes the scenes with the Winslows’ lawyer, Sir Robert Morton (Timothy Watson), all the more uncomfortable to watch. Butler does well to play a 13-15-year-old; his body language ranges from shy and nervous to excitable, which further reinforces his childish innocence.

Timothy Watson gives a commanding portrayal of Morton; the performance is gripping from beginning to end and treads the fine line between caricature and authenticity. His stiff and domineering body language creates a claustrophobic atmosphere in Act Two, ramping up the intensity of the Winslow trial.

The set is a typical, yet detailed, Edwardian living room – comfortable, decorative and decorous. Scene changes are punctuated with a backdrop of architectural columns that hint at the world of labyrinthine government bureaucracy in which the Winslows have found themselves.

At two and a half hours, The Winslow Boy does not feel over long. Rachel Kavanaugh and her cast present an absorbing and thrilling production that I thoroughly enjoyed. I would happily recommend this revival of a classic stage play to anyone, whether a previous fan of Rattigan’s writing or not.

The Winslow Boy runs at the Birmingham REP until Saturday 3rd March. For full details, including all performance times and prices, visit www.birmingham-rep.co.uk/whats-on/the-winslow-boy 

For more from the Birmingham REP, including full event listings and online ticket sales, visit www.birmingham-rep.co.uk

BPREVIEW: The Winslow Boy @ Birmingham REP 21.02 – 03.03.18

The Winslow Boy @ Birmingham REP 21.02 - 03.03.18Words by Lucy Mounfield / Pics courtesy of the Birmingham REP

On Wednesday 21st February, a major new revival of Terence Rattigan’s much loved The Winslow Boy will begin its run at the Birmingham REP – being performed at the theatre until Saturday 3rd March.

A preview performance will be held on Wednesday 21st at 7.30pm at a reduced price of £10, as well as a matinee at 2pm on Thursday 22nd. Further matinee’s will be every Saturday and Thursday at 2pm, whilst evening performances will be from 7.30pm Monday to Saturday.

The standard price will be £15 although ticket prices vary depending on the date and time of performance, as well as seat positioning. For direct show information, including a full breakdown of performances and online ticket sales, click here.

Terence Rattigan is recognised as one of the most eminent dramatists of the twentieth century. His plays are regularly being revived, most notably French Without Tears (1936), Flare Path (1942), The Browning Version (1948) and The Deep Blue Sea (1952) – the latter of which was adapted to film in 2011 by Terence Davies, starring Rachel Weisz and Tom Hiddleston. To further mark the centenary of Rattigan’s birth, Trevor Nunn also revived Flare Path in 2011 for the West End to critical acclaim.

But during the 1950s and 60s, Rattigan fell out of favour with the theatre. His depictions of the upper-middle class were seen as old-fashioned and out of place, whilst dramatists such as John Osborne and Harold Pinter were depicting social change and a Britain both divided by class and fatigued by war. Today’s productions of Rattigan’s work highlight his central themes of English reticence, repression, outsiders, and courageous truth seekers.The Winslow Boy @ Birmingham REP 21.02 - 03.03.18

The Winslow Boy was first produced at the Lyric Theatre, London, on May 3rd 1946, with notable names such as Angela Baddeley and Emlyn Williams in the cast. The play is written by Terence Rattigan but is based on a true story of a legal case that erupted during the early nineteen-hundreds. A naval cadet at Osborne Naval College is accused and expelled for stealing a five-shilling postal order. The boy’s family, convinced of his innocence, are persuaded to take the case to court to clear the family name and restore their honour.

Rattigan’s sets The Winslow Boy in London prior to the First World War and opens the family to scrutiny. The cadet, Ronnie Winslow, returns home after his stay at the Naval College with a letter of expulsion for stealing.The Winslow Boy @ Birmingham REP 21.02 - 03.03.18 Without a school inspection or trial, he is sentenced for a crime he denies he committed; the Winslow family must seek the truth to restore the order and balance to their home.

The determination of his father in seeking justice is the crux of the narrative and ultimately the undoing of the family’s happiness. And whilst the play may be ‘old-fashioned’ in the period detail and writing style, in an age where ‘fake news’ reigns it is surely an interesting bridge to an epoch when English values and the notion of familial honour could easily be ripped apart by scandal.

Olivier Award winning Rachel Kavanaugh, the former Birmingham REP Artistic Director, will be directing this new production of The Winslow Boy and overseeing a formidable cast including Tessa Peake-Jones (Only Fools and Horses) as the matriarch Grace Winslow, Aden Gillett (House of Elliot) as the father Arthur Winslow, and Timothy Watson (The Archers) as barrister Sir Robert Morton. Joining this fantastic company of actors, and making his stage debut as Ronnie Winslow, is Misha Butler.

The Winslow Boy – an interview with the director and principal cast

The Winslow Boy runs at the Birmingham REP from Wednesday 21st February to Saturday 3rd March. For direct show information, including a full breakdown of performances and online ticket sales, visit www.birmingham-rep.co.uk/whats-on/the-winslow-boy

For more from the Birmingham REP, including full event listings and online ticket sales, visit www.birmingham-rep.co.uk

BREVIEW: Brief Encounter @ REP until 17.02.18

Brief Encounter @ REP running until 17.02.18

Words by Lucy Mounfield

Heading to the Birmingham REP for Kneehigh Theatre’s Brief Encounter, I pondered what might be in store. Kneehigh always produce imaginative and lively productions, where music, dance and high theatricality have all play a large part in developing the atmosphere.

946: The Amazing Story of Adolphus Tips utilised puppetry, the carnivalesque, lindy hop, music, extensive props and costume changes to aid the story-telling, and this worked a treat: the chaotic upheaval and influx of American GIs during world war two was brought to life.

All the theatrical accouterments were used to great effect and in service of the story. However, the frenetic effects of Kneehigh productions have tended, in my opinion, to jar with romantic or serious plays. Their 2015 adaptation of Daphne Du Maurier’s romantic thriller Rebecca was a feast for the senses, but it left me a little cold.

Brief Encounter @ REP running until 17.02.18As a fan of the book, I felt that Du Maurier’s Gothic sensibilities were flattened by the silliness and high-camp of the Charleston music and the dancing during the intervals. The shanty singing built up an eerie tension as the boat containing Rebecca’s dead body was raised from the sea, and was in service to the play, yet these moments became more frequent as the play progressed and ultimately dimmed the climatic reveal at the end. And how could comedic musicality work in an adaptation of such an emotionally sincere script as Brief Encounter?

I have been an admirer of David Lean’s cinematic masterpiece Brief Encounter (and Noël Coward’s screenplay for it) since I watched it as a child. What immediately comes to my mind for me, and probably for many people, is the image of Celia Johnson and Trevor Howard as protagonists Laura and Alec looking deeply into one another’s eyes before they depart at a train station, seemingly never to be reunited.Brief Encounter @ REP running until 17.02.18 They find each other and wish for their love to continue, but outside commitments interfere. Although they do not remain together, they forever have the experience of their romance.

So, with all this in my mind, I was a little nervous. However, it is reassuring that, as you enter the theatre, director Emma Rice has referenced the original film: the space has been re-imagined as a cinema auditorium, with a screen on stage playing clips that meld with the performance, the actors slipping in and out, sometimes watching from seats at the front. Ushers show us to our seats, adding a special nostalgic touch.

Not everything seems to fit though: a glitzy curtain is drawn across the stage with a pink gel cast onto it making it seem bawdy and cabaret-like, which seemed slightly out of place for a ‘30s cinema. On stage, musicians and singers (all members of the cast) perform witty ditties from Coward’s 1930s back catalogue whilst ushers mingle with the audience. The songs work well with the cinematic stage, balancing the serendipity of love with the reality of life.

The trope of the cinema screen is a fantastic way to situate the story of Laura (Isobel Pollen), a bored housewife. Whilst she sits with Alec (Jim Sturgeon) on the front row with the audience, her husband Fred (Dean Nolan) is on the screen asking for her to return. Laura pulls away from Alec and walks onto the stage and into the screen.Brief Encounter @ REP running until 17.02.18 This is an effective way to prefigure her encounter with Alec at the train station and foreshadows the end of the play, perfectly pitching the balance between the stylistic elements of the piece with the poignancy of her return.

This filmic technique is used less as the performance gets going; from here on, Kneehigh’s version takes the intimate world of Laura and Alec and blows it wide open to include an ensemble cast of couples, station staff and Laura’s family and friends. Their first meeting, when Alec removes some grit from Laura’s eye, is a tender moment which, for me, was slightly marred by movement from the ensemble cast behind them.

The station scenes provide comedy, whilst courting couples contrast with the intimacy of the protagonist’s stiff emotion. Beverley Russ as Beryl stands out as the naïve café waitress who is being courted by Jos Slovick’s Stanley. These characters were superbly acted, but at times they distracted from the story of Laura and Alec; each couple had a story to tell, but this resulted in them competing for attention with (and detracting from the nuanced dialog and intimacy between) the leads.

FBrief Encounter @ REP running until 17.02.18or instance, the buns that Beryl and her boss Myrtle (Lucy Thackeray) bake are used in a Carry On routine wherein Beryl teases Stanley by placing a bun on each of her breasts. At their best, though, the flamboyant station staff and travelers, through their cavorting and dancing, provide a fluid physicality that juxtaposes with Laura and Alec’s reserved body-language. It is what they both cannot say and do that makes the most powerful statements.

The scene that really hits the mark is the boat scene in which the main, couple during a romantic boat ride, fall overboard. The quiet moment sees them merely undressing their wet clothes and announce to each other their love. The ensemble cast add to the atmosphere with gently singing an almost lullaby effect. However, as the scene changes the glamourous curtain comes down and Slovick sings in a cabaret rock style, Coward’s ‘I’m Mad About the Boy’. This completely contrasts with the naturalness and beauty of the early moment and is too fast paced. When Rice gets it right Brief Encounter is fantastic but all too often she intersperses fast physical dance routines that, for me, jar with the tone of the romance.

Brief Encounter @ REP running until 17.02.18Projection is used throughout to submerge us within the period; black and white images of trains, menus, ticket stubs, timetables, and so on, all flash past. Most effectively, in one scene, a calendar and pressure gauge from a train are used to symbolise Laura’s desperation to see Alec and the pressure that their affair creates. A further theme throughout Kneehigh‘s Brief Encounter is Laura’s childhood desire to swim in the Devon sea, with the projection often showing choppy coastal waves. The natural freedom with which the waves crash and roll against each other symbolises Laura’s desire to let go and fully embrace Alec. After she kisses him, Laura’s body contorts and bends to the shape of the sea, her eyes closed as if the power of his kiss has transported her back to her natural raw state.

The ending is particularly moving too, as Laura and Alec finally say goodbye only for Laura’s annoying friend Hermione (Rudd) to interfere. Laura, in a fit of desperation, runs off to a bridge where she contemplates throwing herself onto the train tracks until a train races past on a cloth projection and she collapses in a heap. The thunderous classical music played at the end, by Laura, perfectly matches her heartbreak and suggests that forever she will play music to remember Alec.

The world that is created is rather fantastical, yet the period detail does occasional err on the side of parody. For instance, a model train is used with a smoke machine to create the effect of a passing steam locomotive, which is effective yet comical. The raucous comedy and dance is highly entertaining, but it fails to capture the flawed middle-class sensibilities of the ‘30s and ‘40s.

If you love the style of previous Kneehigh productions, then you will love their adaptation of Brief Encounter, and overall it is a wondrous love story. But as an adaptation of the cinematic classic, for me, it falls a little too far from the mark.

Brief Encounter runs at the Birmingham REP until Saturday 17th February. For direct show information – including all performance times, venue details and online ticket sales, visit www.birmingham-rep.co.uk/whats-on/brief-encounter

For more from Kneehigh Theatre, visit www.kneehigh.co.uk

For more from the Birmingham REP, including full event listings and online ticket sales, visit www.birmingham-rep.co.uk

BPREVIEW: Brief Encounter @ REP 02-17.02.18

Brief Encounter @ REP 02-17.02.18

Words by Lucy Mounfield

From Friday 2nd to Saturday 17th February, the Birmingham REP’s main stage, The House, will host Kneehigh Theatre’s adaptation of Brief Encounterwritten and directed by Kneehigh’s former artistic director, Emma Rice.

Brief Encounter will present evening shows every day at 7:30pm (except Sundays), with a Saturday matinee at 2:00pm on 10th and 17th February.

Extra shows will included a captioned performance at 2pm on Thursday 8th February, an audio described performance at 7:30pm on Friday 9th February, a relaxed performance on at 2pm on Thursday 15th February, and a BSL interpreted performance at 7:30pm on Friday 16th February.

Tickets to Brief Encounter at REP are priced at £10-£15, dependent on the day and time of performance. For direct show information – including all performance times, venue details and online ticket sales, click here.

Originally commissioned and produced by David Pugh & Dafydd Rogers and Cineworld in 2008, opening at the Birmingham REPKneehigh Theatre have revived the production with a new cast for a 2018 UK tour.

Prior to debuting Brief Encounter ten years ago, Kneehigh Theatre have produced numerous theatrical adaptations such as Daphne Du Maurier’s Rebecca, Powell and Pressburger’s The Red Shoes and A Matter of Life and Death – as well as family favourites such as 946: The Amazing Story of Adolphus Tips based on Michael Morpurgo’s classic novel.

Kneehigh create ‘vigorous, popular and challenging theatre and perform with joyful anarchy’ – taking the seemingly unadaptable and making it come to life on stage with bold and charismatic touches. The Cornish theatre company has been producing shows for over 30 years, with a portfolio that has helped them build a reputation and tour circuit far beyond the ‘breath taking barns on the South Coast of Cornwall’ where they began.

Kneehigh Theatre’s Brief Encounter is adapted from Noël Coward’s screenplay for the 1945 film of the same name, which was based on Coward’s 1936 one-act play Still Life. The film, directed by David Lean, has become widely regarded as a cornerstone of British cinema and has been hailed as a romantic masterpiece by many critics.

Brief Encounter has also garnered a special place in many people’s hearts – arguably defining the society and frustrations of a wartime generation. On the eve of the second world war, Laura, a married woman with children, encounters a chance meeting at a railway station with a man called Alec. From their casual conversations the two are immediately attracted to one another, they arrange further meetings – despite the social taboos of the time – and soon fall in love.

“I’m a happily married woman. Or rather I was until a few weeks ago. This is my whole world and it’s enough, or rather it was until a few weeks ago. Your heart dances. The world seems strange and new. You want to laugh and skip and fall forever… You are in love. You are in love with the wrong person.”

With lines such as these it’s easy to see why many have fallen in love with the characters and unapologetic, ‘haunting’ romanticism of Coward’s writing – a man who was no stranger to the attention of a more clipped and unforgiving era.

Kneehigh Theatre have tackled such themes of love and desire before in their productions of Rebecca, Tristan & Yseult, and A Matter of Life and Death, marrying the light and dark elements of romance, punctuating stark realist moments with dark comic bursts of theatricality. Hopefully with her adaptation of Brief Encounter, Rice will retain the essence of Coward’s witty yet candid script whilst maintaining her signature inventive and breathtakingly bold direction.

Brief Encounter – Behind the scenes with Kneehigh Theatre

Brief Encounter runs at the Birmingham REP from Friday 2nd to Saturday 17th February. For direct show information – including all performance times, venue details and online ticket sales, visit www.birmingham-rep.co.uk/whats-on/brief-encounter

For more from Kneehigh Theatre, visit www.kneehigh.co.uk   

For more from the Birmingham REP, including full event listings and online ticket sales, visit www.birmingham-rep.co.uk

BREVIEW: Dots & Loops #5 @ Rose Villa Tavern 19.12.17

Dots & Loops #5 @ The Rose Villa Tavern 19.12.17

Words by Ashleigh Goodwin 

It’s a Tuesday night, and a small crowd packs into the upstairs room of The Rose Villa Tavern in the Jewellery Quarter. A mismatched array of chairs fills most of the space, as well as a projector that hangs from the ceiling… and I am confused.

Director and animator Louis Hudson, alongside writer and producer Ian Ravenscroft, stand before the crowd and explain that they will be showing a mix of their own collaborations, along with shorts that have inspired and influenced their work. The duo make up Dice Productions – a company that boasts an extensive and award-winning body of work, with their comedy shorts and animations appearing on Nickelodeon (DuckManBoy), Channel 4 (Gregory is a Dancer) and the BBC.

The premise is simple enough and this is not what causes my confusion, but rather the eclectic content. The evening opens with Dice Production’s catalyst, Message in a Bottle (2009) – a one minute animated short based on a drawing that Hudson created when he was around sixteen. This, along with the next couple of shorts, did nothing to aid my journey of understanding. The confusion grew to bewilderment, as my brain struggled to catch up and make sense of what I was (admittedly, excitedly) watching.

I carried this dilemma with me until the fifth piece, entitled All Consuming Love (Man in a Cat), a nine-minute short, unsurprisingly about a little man named Yorkie (voiced by Kevin Eldon) navigating life stuck in the body of a household cat. At this point, I realised that I had to shove any preconceived notions aside. Usually when watching something I need time to process my thoughts, to establish an explanation before moving on. However, the format of the evening – showing shorts one after another in quick succession – just does not permit this. So, after battling with myself I surrender to the ‘just-go-with-it’ mentality, which is the point and made for an extremely entertaining evening.

Although all of the shorts’ comedy is uncontainable and indescribable, the first section is darker and more twisted, including Who I Am And What I Want (2005 – directed by Chris Shepherd and David Shirgley) and Myszochujek (2014 – directed by Kristof Babaski). Part two features assorted clips, starring Morecambe and Wise, Reeves and Mortimer and the cast of The Fast Show – creators who took a medium and distorted it to work against its predetermined rules. This is reflected in The Christmas Card (1968 – directed by Terry Gilliam), which played with the repetition of TV and its traditional conventions long before they were established, allowing a comedy format to be created; a short ahead of its time.

Rejected (2000 – directed by Don Hertzfeldt), is also in this section and demonstrates the deeper, more emotional side of comedic shorts. Rejected is a fictional frame story, where Hertzfeldt is commissioned to animate different commercial and television network segments, all of which are ultimately met with rejection. His characters run amuck, and when the intertitle states that the animator has suffered a mental breakdown his work begins to fall in on itself whilst he kills his characters. This could be described as black comedy at a glance, but once you explore the serious implications it demonstrates how much effort, time and dedication go into these works.

The final section of the evening focuses on a more child-friendly narrative, comprising of clips from children’s shows such as Danger Mouse (1982), Brillso Brothers (2008) and Hudson and Ravenscroft’s own work, DuckManBoy (2015). Despite the child-like qualities of these works, they still contain absurdities. I have seen a handful of these clips before, but never thought to analyse or breakdown their comedic properties. This is echoed by Ravenscroft, who states that we often don’t think about how much work goes into shorts and may dismiss them as “throwaway comedy”.

A great example of this is the side-splittingly funny Morecambe and Wise: The Breakfast Sketch. Hudson points out that someone will have taken the upmost time and care creating bizarre props, including a bespoke fridge that mimics the lights in a cabaret, all for a short clip.

This is reflected in their own work, Croissant (2015), which Hudson explains took around five months to make, to ensure that everything was in place to land the desired comedic effect. And the short is only two minutes long. He explains this could have been done easily over a weekend using animation, but stresses the importance of picking the correct format to convey comedy – hence the choice of a ‘live’ short, despite the laborious hours. This particular discussion is nothing short of inspiring in itself, really opening my eyes to each clip and making me appreciate how much effort goes into each frame.

My personal highlight of the evening is the segment about English comedian Rik Mayall, who is one of the first comedians I was introduced to growing up. In part two, they show a clip from Bottom (1992) and this preludes Dice’s own work Don’t Fear Death (2013) also starring Mayall as the main voice over, with Ed Bye (director of Red Dwarf 1988-91, 1997-99) as Associate Producer. The duo agree they felt they had successfully captured all sides of Mayall in the three-minute short, released three months before his death. Hearing Hudson and Ravenscroft talk so candidly about the actor, his mannerisms and genuine character, is uplifting and makes the short so much more enjoyable.

As well as feeling inspired, I come away from Dots & Loops #5 feeling educated by Louis Hudson and Ian Ravenscroft’s reflective, personal knowledge of the clips and the comedy world in general. For example, the Dice Production duo’s discussion of how repetition in comedy affects its audience is perfectly demonstrated through the four-minute Lesley the Pony Has an A+ Day! (2014). And their thoughts on the changing landscape of comedy shorts is fascinating; Ravenscroft explains that the third clip shown, A Heap of Trouble (2001 – directed by Steven Sullivan), was commissioned and aired on Channel 4 but suggested that today it wouldn’t fit a late-night slot, although may achieve millions of hits online. They discuss the changes in YouTube algorithms which make it harder to find new and inspiring content, raising interesting questions regarding the changes in formats and mediums in which comedy shorts operate and are distributed.

So, in an attempt to summarise the immensely enjoyable and eye-opening event… I was expecting to passively observe the shorts shown, as I felt I wouldn’t be able to appreciate them individually in such a short time. However, once I had wrapped my head around the unrelated narratives, it was an interesting event to be part of for many reasons – I learnt something new, was exposed to new content, and felt the importance of creativity reaffirmed.

Dots & Loops’ fifth edition also demonstrated that whilst there are absurdities and idiosyncrasies, no work is completely original; you will be able to relate it to something prior or see where the artist’s influence has come from. It also showed how genres develop and modify over time, adjusting to modern factors.

Shows like Bottom may look dated these days, but you can still break down work to see what it is that makes it entertaining. It’s then up to artists to take and develop this into something new and exciting that works within their own ideologies. And that’s exactly what Dice Productions does.

All Consuming Love (Man In A Cat) – Dice Productions 

 

For more from Flatpack, including full event listings and project information, visit www.flatpackfestival.org.uk

For more on Dice Productions, visit www.diceproductions.co.uk

For more on The Rose Villa Tavern, visit www.therosevillatavern.co.uk